Key Fact 3

Teachers' Guide

This is the main guide for healthy eating for children aged 8-11 years.

Key Fact 1

Around the world people choose and combine different foods to make meals and snacks. The total amount and range of foods eaten is called the diet.

Key Fact 2

A healthy diet is made up from a variety and balance of different foods and drinks, as depicted in the Eatwell Guide.

Key Fact 3

To be active and healthy, food is needed to provide energy for the body.

Key Fact 4

A variety of food is needed in the diet because different foods contain different substances that are needed for health. These are nutrients, water and fibre.

Key Fact 5

Being active and looking after yourself are important for health.
Key Fact 3

Key Fact 3: To be active and healthy, food is needed to provide energy for the body.

This section provides you with detailed teaching plans for Key Fact 3, including links to all the downloadable resources.


a) To understand that different types of food provide different amounts of energy.

Introduction
Use the Energy Cards 152 to introduce the concept that different types of foods provide different amounts of energy. You may wish to use the Energy PowerPoint 152 for this Key Fact.

Ask the children to rank the Energy Cards 152 in order of energy provided per 100g.

  • Which foods provide the most energy?
  • Which provide the least?

b) To understand that different amounts of food, known as portions, provide different amounts of energy.

Use the How do we get energy? Poster 151 to show the portion sizes for a range of food, all providing 400kJ of energy.

Ask the children:

  • Which food has the largest portion by weight  to provide 400kJ of energy?
  • Which is the smallest?
  • How does this compare with the ranking activity (see a)?

Use the Energy Portions Worksheet (Excel) 160 to model the affect of changing portion size on the energy provided.


c) To understand that different amounts of energy are needed by the body for different activities.

Use the How do we use energy? Poster 152 to find out the energy requirements of different activities.

Ask the children to keep an activity diary for 1 day. Use the Activity diary Worksheet 161.

Calculate the energy used for 1 day. Present this as a class bar chart. Use the Energy chart Worksheet 162 to help.

Calculate the energy used for 1 day.  Present this as a class bar chart.


d) To recognise that energy requirements vary between individuals.

Investigate the energy needs of different people. Ask children to write down the reasons why different people might use different amounts of energy. Prompts include: age, job and health.
Use the Energy needs Worksheet 163 or the Energy PowerPoint 152.


e) To understand that to be healthy, energy balance should be achieved (over a period of time).

Introduce the concept of energy balance to the children. We get energy (in) from food and we use energy doing different types of activity (out).

Over time:

  • If we consume more energy than we use, we will gain weight;
  • If we consume less energy than we use, we will lose weight;
  • If we have energy balance (consuming and using the same amount of energy), our weight will stay the same.

You could explain this concept like a see-saw on the board.


Plenary

Recap with children


Food provides energy in different amounts.

Different amounts of the same food, know as portions, provide different amounts of energy.

Different types of activity need more/less energy than others, e.g. sleeping and running.

Different people need more/less energy.

Further activities

Get the children to look through different types of food packaging or labelling, making a display of the different amounts of energy provided.

Downloadable resources