Food cards

Board games

Download the From farm to fork! and Food route board games.

Posters

PDF posters for use in the classroom.

Food cards

Sets of BNF Food Cards for pupils aged 5 to 16 years.

Are you drinking plenty?

Poster and teachers' guide.

Multi-purpose teaching resource

Supported with activity instructions and question cards.

mywellbeing

mywellbeing teachers' guide

Exam specification grids

Links to resources which support GCSE D&T: food/Home Economics and National 4 and 5 Healthy and Food Technology in Scotland.

Love your lunch

Love your lunch - ideas and resources to support work around school lunch.

Worksheets (Primary and SEN)

Worksheets for use in school.

ICT

Resources using the computer.

CAD and CAM

More resources for the computer.

How to ...

How To explain how to perform a variety of specific tasks and tests.

Energy and nutrients case studies

Case studies on different aspects of energy and nutrients.

Experiment sheets

Ideas for experiments in the classroom.

Product analysis

Worksheets to help with product analysis.

Sensory evaluation

How to conduct different sensory evaluation tests.

Smart foods

Find out about smart foods.

What can you see?

A poster and teachers' activity notes.

Conditions of use

Copyright and conditions of use.

This section contains 7 sets of BNF Food Cards for pupils aged 5 to 16 years.  Simply download the file, print-out (in colour), cut and laminate. 

 

Last reviewed: 08/10/2012

Next review date: 08/10/2015


Alphabet Food Cards

The pdf file below contains an A-Z set of 44 cards of food related illustrations with the complete word.  

The flash cards may be used to:

* construct a food alphabet;
* devise food chains;
* assist in language work;
* classification work, e.g. plants and animals, solids and liquids.



Food Safety Cards

The pdf file below contains 9 flash cards of  related illustrations with key questions from the BNF food safety poster (see Poster section in Teacher Centre).



Nutrient cards

A variety of food is needed in the diet because different foods contain different substances that are needed for health. These substances are nutrients (some of which provide energy, i.e. protein, carbohydrate and fat), water and fibre.

BNF Food Cards show the amount of energy and nutrients provided by 100g of 10 familiar foods. These can be printed in colour (A5 size), laminated and used for:

  • Introducing the concept that foods provide energy (in different amounts);
  • Showing that different foods provide different amounts of energy and nutrients;
  • Highlighting the concept that protein, carbohydrate and fat provide energy in different amounts (this is why 100g of different foods provide different amounts of energy,  due to the relative amount of these 3 nutrients); 
  • Comparing the energy and nutrients provided by different foods per 100g;
  • Ranking the food cards in order of energy (or a nutrient) provided per 100g;
  • Considering how much food weighs 100g and whether this amount would usually be eaten as a serving;
  • Calculating the energy and nutrients provided by different portion sizes. 


Meal Cards

The BNF Meal Cards are a resource that can be used in many ways within  lessons. A few examples are included below to get you started. To begin, simply download the cards following the instructions provided and laminate them for longevity.

The meal cards are grouped into 2 sets:

Set 1. A series of meals labelled with large bold font.

Set 2. A series of unlabelled meals with blank boxes.

Activities

1. Comparing meals

Show the pupils photographs 1 and 2 from Set 1.

  • Photograph 1 - Thin based cheese and tomato pizza with chips and garlic bread;
  • Photograph 2 - Thick based vegetable pizza with less cheese, a baked potato and a side salad.

Encourage the pupils to discuss the ways in which the meals in the photographs have changed. How has the balance been modified?

Useful prompts may include:

  • Different ways to reduce the fat content;
  • Discuss ways of reducing the amount of fat provided by foods that are sources of protein and calcium, e.g. cheese.
  • Discuss ways of increasing fruit and vegetables through ingredient choice, e.g. addition of vegetables to dishes.

Photograph 2 - the changes:

  • The pizza has less cheese, so is lower in fat, and has more vegetables, which contribute to the 5-a-day message.
  • The pizza has a thicker base, providing more carbohydrate - making it more filling.
  • The garlic bread, which may be high in fat, has been replaced by a salad. The side salad increases the amount of vegetables provided.
  • The baked potato is lower in fat than chips, unless lots of butter is added.
  • Salad has more fibre than garlic bread.

2. Balancing meals

Using Set 1, encourage pupils to describe changes that could be made to the meals to bring them in line with healthy eating guidelines, based on the eatwell plate. (All photographs may be used, except number 2.)

Discuss a few examples with the whole class. Ask for feedback from the class, allowing pupils to talk about the changes they have made to the meals in the photographs and the benefits the changes may have. For example, Photograph 8:

Baked potato, cake and chocolate milkshake

Suggestions to changes may include:

  • Substituting the cake for fruit salad and a scoop of yogurt or low fat icecream increases the calcium content and decreases the fat content;
  • Adding a side salad increases the number of servings of fruit and vegetables;
  • A chocolate milkshake is a good source of calcium and protein, however using skimmed or semi-skimmed milk will decrease the fat content.

3. Where does food come from?

Using Set 1, discuss the foods used to make the meals. For example, see Photograph 5 Full English Breakfast. Using this meal as a prompt, discuss the following:

  • Where do eggs come from?
  • Where does bread come from? How is it made?
  • How do mushrooms grow?
  • Are mushrooms a plant or an animal?
  • Where do sausages come from? How are they made?
  • What animal provides bacon?
  • Which foods come from plants? Which foods come from animals?

4. Cooking methods

Using Set 1, as part of a science lesson, discuss the methods of cooking or heat transfer involved.

5. Complete the meal

Using Set 2, to aid literacy, pupils could fill in the correct words in the blank boxes (supportive words have been provided).

6. Supporting Pupils with Special Educational Needs

Sets 1 and 2 could be used with pupils to develop vocabulary, further their food and nutrition knowledge and review cooking skills.



Shifting the Balance

The pdf files below contain photographs of the meals featured on the BNF poster, Shifting the Balance. The cards can be used as a starter activity to engage pupils into healthy eating and nutrition principles quickly, provide a quick instant display or act as a stimulus for design work, e.g. lower fat product development. Each file contains 8 A4 colour photo cards.

Balancing meals

Using the photographs, encourage pupils to describe changes that could be made to the meals to bring them in line with healthy eating guidelines, based on the eatwell plate.

Discuss a few examples with the whole class. Ask for feedback from the class, allowing pupils to talk about the changes they have made to the meals in the photographs and the benefits the changes may have. Some pupils could conduct nutritional analysis work.



Food Functions

These six cards give details of the food functions for everyday products. Aetate, Bind, Bulk, Glaze, Set and Thicken are covered.



Energy cards

We have created a new set of cards to show the amount of energy provided by a range of food and drinks. These can be used in a number of ways, such as ordering from low to high energy and matching food and drinks that provide similar amounts of energy. For older students, alcoholic drinks are provided.